Gosford House, East Lothian; guided visits

Two guided walks around this historic landscape

10.30am and 2.30pm, Sunday 17 September

Gosford is one of the finest late 18th century landscapes in Scotland. Located on the south side of the Firth of Forth, the seat of the Earls of Wemyss and March, and extends to some 5,000 acres of coast and parkland.

The Mausoleum, Gosford, photo by Kristina Taylor

The Mausoleum, Gosford, photo by Kristina Taylor

Kristina Taylor will lead two separate 2-hour walking tours around Gosford landscape with visits into the Mausoleum (above), the Curling House (with a talk by Richard Gillanders on its stone collection and decoration) and the Octagon room in the house. Plans to further restore the landscape to will be revealed.

Meet inside the North Gate, parking to the left, at 10.30am for a morning visit and 2.30pm for an afternoon visit.

The Curling House, Gosford, photo by Kristina Taylor

The Curling House, Gosford, photo by Kristina Taylor

The event is free, booking details to follow.

Download a plan/map of the park

From Gosford’s website:

Gosford House, the seat of the Earls of Wemyss and March, is set in 5,000 acres of combined coast and parkland in East Lothian on the south side of the Firth of Forth and close to the celebrated golf courses of Muirfield, Gullane and Craigielaw.

The property is dominated by Gosford House, an imposing neo-classical mansion which was one of the last great architectural commissions of the celebrated Scots architect, Robert Adam. Constructed for the seventh Earl of Wemyss, the building was completed in 1800 – eight years after the architect’s death – and is recognised as an outstanding example of the later period of his work.

Inside, the building exceeds the expectations raised by its elegant exterior. The Marble Hall, in the south wing, is arguably the most arresting of its many fine features. It was completed in 1891 by William Young for the tenth Earl of Wemyss and rises to a height of three storeys, with a magnificent double staircase leading to a surrounding picture gallery. The elaborate fireplace, alabaster colonnades and ornate plasterwork reflect the strong Italianate taste of the tenth Earl, while the Palladian screen of Venetian windows are reminiscent of Adam’s original designs.

 

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